9 June 2015

MONTRÉAL, QC — The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation is proud to present the 2015 recipients of its coveted doctoral scholarship in the social sciences and humanities. The sixteen 2015 Trudeau scholars are exceptional Canadian students who have distinguished themselves through academic excellence, civic engagement, and a commitment to reaching beyond academic circles. The cohort joins a network of some 370 promising researchers, outstanding intellectuals, and seasoned decision-makers committed to applying their knowledge and skills to pressing Canadian and global issues.

The 2015 Trudeau scholars:

  • Erin Aylward (political science, University of Toronto) is applying her background in international development to explore the influence of global advocacy and diplomacy of LGBTQ rights on public opinion and political action in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Samara Brock (environmental studies, Yale University) is looking at Canada’s role in assessing and addressing the domestic and international impact of mining activities on agriculture and food security.
  • Avram Denburg (health policy, McMaster University) is a paediatric oncologist working to construct a more coherent decision-making framework—informed by public values—for funding new cancer drugs for children in Canada.
  • Marie-France Fortin (law, Université Laval) is studying whether the historic rule of state immunity still has its place in Canada and abroad or whether restricting or abolishing that rule would better align with democratic principles in today’s society.
  • Bailey Gerrits (political studies, Queen’s University) is examining how Canadian news coverage of domestic violence may promote the idea that domestic violence is “un-Canadian.”
  • William Hébert (social-cultural anthropology, University of Toronto) is looking into how Canada can learn from Brazil to better protect transgender prisoners’ rights and life conditions—within prison walls and beyond.
  • Jennifer Jones (geography, University of Guelph) is interested in finding a more accurate methodology to assess the impact of mine development on the health and well-being of Canada’s northern Indigenous communities.
  • Andréanne LeBrun (history, Université de Sherbrooke) is building on her experience as a high school teacher to study different models of citizenship taught in Quebec school curricula in the 20th century and their impact on youth political engagement.
  • Caroline Lieffers (history of science and medicine, Yale University) is evaluating how disabilities helped nation-building in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries and how this history informs the relationship between today’s disabled people and the State.
  • Rebeccah Nelems (sociology and cultural, social and political thought, University of Victoria) is examining how Canadian youth experience empathy and how empathy affects young people’s conception of responsible citizenship, civic engagement, and social interactions.
  • Jennifer Peirce (criminal justice, City University of New York) is exploring how prison governance reforms in Latin America and the Caribbean over the last twenty years have influenced detention conditions and rehabilitation initiatives.
  • Benjamin Perryman (law, Yale University) will apply the emerging science of happiness studies to constitutional law to propose a way that Canadian court decisions might better reflect the needs and aspirations of all citizens, including the marginalized.
  • Tahnee Prior (global governance, University of Waterloo) hopes to define a new governance framework that will address the emerging and complex issues caused by climate change, resource extraction, migration, and potential inter-state conflict in the Arctic.
  • Meaghan Thumath (nursing, University of British Columbia) is a public health and outreach nurse seeking to improve access to primary healthcare for Indigenous women in Canada and abroad.
  • Ben Verboom (social intervention, University of Oxford) is seeking ways to improve access to, and use of, research evidence in global health policymaking in Canadian and intergovernmental institutions.
  • Anelyse Weiler (sociology, University of Toronto) seeks to understand how the precarious status of migrant farmworkers in Canada can help inform local and international efforts to establish more equitable and ecological food systems.

About the scholarships
Over their three-year doctoral scholarship, Trudeau scholars work with an engaged and inspiring community of scholars, mentors, and fellows that accelerates their professional growth. As part of the $60,000 annual package, Trudeau scholarships include a $20,000 travel and networking allowance that facilitates scholars’ fieldwork and helps them organize and participate in global research and Foundation events. Since the program’s inception in 2003, the Foundation has awarded 187 scholarships representing an investment of $20 million in Canada’s intellectual leadership.

About the Foundation
The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation is an independent and nonpartisan charity established in 2001 as a living memorial to the former prime minister by his family, friends, and colleagues. In 2002, with the support of the House of Commons, the Government of Canada endowed the Foundation with the Advanced Research in the Humanities and Human Sciences Fund. The Foundation also benefits from private donations. By granting doctoral scholarships, awarding fellowships, appointing mentors, and holding public events, the Foundation encourages critical reflection and action in four areas important to Canadians: human rights and dignity, responsible citizenship, Canada’s role in the world, and people and their natural environment.

 

Erin Aylward

Erin Aylward (political science, University of Toronto) is analyzing the influence of advocacy and international diplomacy on public opinion and political action in Sub-Saharan Africa.

2015 Scholars

Samara Brock

Samara Brock (environmental studies, Yale University) is looking at Canada’s role in assessing and addressing the domestic and international impact of mining activities on agriculture and food security.

2015 Scholars

Avram Denburg

Avram Denburg (health policy, McMaster University) is attempting to develop a framework for making decisions about public funding for new medicines to treat childhood cancers in Canada.

2015 Scholars

Marie-France Fortin

Marie-France Fortin (legal studies, University of Cambridge) is studying the historical principle of state sovereign immunity and investigating the hypothesis that limiting or abolishing this immunity might be more in line with the democratic principles of society today.

2015 Scholars

Bailey Gerrits

Bailey Gerrits (political studies, Queen’s University) is examining media coverage of domestic violence and the way that Canadian media seem to portray this phenomenon as “un-Canadian.”

2015 Scholars

William Hébert

William Hébert (social-cultural anthropology, University of Toronto) is investigating the emergence of trans-affirming policies and projects for trans prisoners in Canada, and asking what they reveal about the conditions of, and limits to, inclusion.

2015 Scholars

Jennifer Jones

Jennifer Jones (geography, University of Guelph) is looking for the best method of assessing the effects of mining industry development on the health and wellness of Aboriginal communities in northern Canada.

2015 Scholars

Andréanne LeBrun

Andréanne LeBrun (history, Université de Sherbrooke) is studying the effects of various models of citizenship and political engagement taught in Quebec schools in the 20th century.

2015 Scholars

Caroline Lieffers

Caroline Lieffers (history of science and medicine, Yale University) is studying the relationship between disability and citizenship in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century United States to better understand how diverse groups of people can contribute to a nation’s goals.

2015 Scholars

Rebeccah Nelems

Rebeccah Nelems (sociology and cultural, social and political thought, University of Victoria) is studying empathy in young people and how it affects their concept of responsible citizenship, their civic engagement, and their social interactions.

2015 Scholars

Jennifer Peirce

Jennifer Peirce (criminal justice, City University of New York) is exploring how prison governance reforms in Latin America and the Caribbean over the last twenty years have influenced detention conditions and rehabilitation initiatives.

2015 Scholars

Benjamin Perryman

Benjamin Perryman (law, Yale University) is applying the emerging science of happiness to ways that Canadian justice might better reflect the needs and aspirations of all citizens, including the marginalized.

2015 Scholars

Tahnee Prior

Tahnee Prior (global governance, University of Waterloo) hopes to define a new governance framework that will address the emerging and complex issues caused by climate change, resource extraction, migration, and potential inter-state conflict in the Arctic.

2015 Scholars

Meaghan Thumath

Meaghan Thumath (social policy and intervention, University of Oxford) is a public health and outreach nurse seeking to understand the effects of child removal on marginalized women in Canada.

2015 Scholars

Ben Verboom

Ben Verboom (social intervention, University of Oxford) is seeking to better understand and encourage the use of science in global health policymaking by Canadian and international institutions.

2015 Scholars

Anelyse Weiler

Anelyse Weiler (sociology, University of Toronto) wants to understand how the perspectives of migrant farmworkers in North America on environmental, health, and equity issues can inform local and international efforts to realize more sustainable food systems.

2015 Scholars