26 June 2018

The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation appoints four new fellows

The 2018 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation fellowships: Audacious projects that are shaping the future of Canada and the world

Montreal, 26 June 2018 – The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation is proud to announce the 2018 recipients of its annual research fellowships. Every year, the Foundation awards up to five fellowships to intellectuals in the humanities and social sciences who are recognized for their productivity, their commitment to communicating their findings to the public, and their ability to devise innovative solutions to some of the major issues facing Canada and the world.

This year’s four fellows will conduct research on:

In addition to receiving a total of $225,000 over the next three years, each new fellow will enjoy unique access to the rich intellectual network of researchers and practitioners who have joined the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation community before them.

The 2018 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellows:

     

Using community empowerment and transformative learning strategies, Professor Cecilia Benoit (sociology, University of Victoria) enables sex workers to become social justice advocates.  

     
  

Engaging the academic, policy, and public spheres, Professor Ayesha S. Chaudhry (gender and Islamic studies, University of British Columbia) sparks a conversation on Islamic legal reform through a Feminist Sharia.

     
  

By excavating and bringing to light often-hidden histories, Professor Malinda S. Smith (political science, University of Alberta) aims to address the virtual absence of Black women in many of the stories that Canadians tell themselves about diversity, citizenship, and belonging.

     
  

By blending research and creative practice in her RELAB, Professor Kim TallBear (Native studies, University of Alberta) seeks to showcase “good relations” between Indigenous peoples and their territories, disrupted by settler-colonial binaries and hierarchies.

      

About the Fellowships

The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation fellowships were established in 2003 to encourage original initiatives and innovative projects that would not necessarily receive support through traditional funding mechanisms. Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation fellows are nominated by their peers and selected by an independent panel. Their research addresses one or more of the Foundation's four key themes and they help further the Foundation's objectives of building an innovative network of academic interchange and public engagement. Since 2014, each fellow proposes a collaborative project which engages other Foundation fellows, mentors, and scholars.

About the Foundation

The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation is an independent and nonpartisan charity established in 2001 as a living memorial to the former prime minister by his family, friends, and colleagues. In 2002, with the support of the House of Commons, the Government of Canada endowed the Foundation with the Advanced Research in the Humanities and Human Sciences Fund. The Foundation also benefits from private donations. By granting doctoral scholarships, awarding fellowships, appointing mentors, and holding public events, the Foundation encourages critical reflection and action in four areas important to Canadians: human rights and dignity, responsible citizenship, Canada’s role in the world, and people and their natural environment.

For more information, visit www.trudeaufoundation.ca.

Follow us on Twitter @F_Trudeau_F, #PETFfellows, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Source:

Gabrielle Denis, Program Assistant, Communications and Public Interaction

The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation

514-938-0001 ext. 229 | gdenis@trudeaufoundation.ca

Cecilia Benoit

Using community empowerment and transformative learning strategies, Professor Cecilia Benoit (sociology, University of Victoria) enables sex workers to become social justice advocates.

2018 Fellows

Ayesha S. Chaudhry

Engaging the academic, policy, and public spheres, Professor Ayesha Chaudhry (gender and Islamic studies, University of British Columbia) sparks a conversation on Islamic legal reform through a Feminist Sharia.

2018 Fellows

Malinda S. Smith

By excavating and foregrounding often-hidden histories, Professor Malinda Smith (political science, University of Alberta) aims to address the virtual absence of Black women in many of the stories that Canadians tell about themselves.  

2018 Fellows

Kim TallBear

By blending research and creative practice in her RELAB, Professor Kim TallBear (Native studies, University of Alberta) seeks to showcase “good relations” between Indigenous peoples and their territories, disrupted by settler-colonial binaries and hierarchies.

2018 Fellows