20 March 2018

The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation announces its 2018 matchings

Montréal, Quebec, 20 March 2018 – The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation is proud to match its 2018 mentors with its 2016 scholars to support them both professionally and personally. By sharing and actively listening, mentors will find another way to put their expertise to good use.

The matchings proposed by the Foundation are an opportunity to experiment outside of one's comfort zone. Everyone will find support in our vibrant community that is open to multiple exchanges.

The 2018 Foundation's matchings:

           
Nathalie Bondil – Montréal, Quebec – As the director and chief curator of the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, Nathalie Bondil steers curative practices towards innovation and multidisciplinarity, generating dialogue in and about art in the city.   Antoine Pellerin (law, Université Laval) is interested in the government’s power to contract and is examining the conditions required for this power to be exercised in the public interest.    
         
   
Pauline Voon(population and public health, University of British Columbia) is exploring how the link between pain management and addiction may affect risky drug use behaviours, health outcomes, and clinical practices and policies.   Mary Anne Chambers – Toronto, Ontario – Rich in experience in private enterprise and the public service, Mary Anne Chambers’s work in community-building and on behalf of youth has benefited hundreds of students in Ontario.   Ido Katri (law, University of Toronto) is proposing an approach to promoting gender self-determination that accounts for the diversity of transgendered people’s unique challenges and values their lived experiences of the law.
         
   
Cynthia Morinville – Geography, University of Toronto – is exploring the lived experiences of informal workers in the global South who extract rare metals from discarded electronic waste. Her research uses documentary filmmaking and photography to tell the e-waste story in a new way.   Denise Chong – Calgary, Alberta – Straddling the worlds of writing and public policy, Denise Chong was a trailblazer for diversity and inclusiveness in the public service before raising Canada’s social consciousness in acclaimed works of nonfiction.   Jesse Thistle – History, York University – is studying the lives of Metis people living on road allowances – makeshift communities built on Crown land along roads and railways on the Canadian Prairies in the 20th century.
         
     
Graham Fraser – Ottawa, Ontario – The commissioner of official languages for Canada from 2006 to 2016 and a former renowned journalist, Graham Fraser contributes a granular and historic analysis of Canadian public policy at the municipal, provincial, and federal levels.   Sébastien Brodeur-Girard – Law, Université de Montréal – is researching ways to reconcile Western law and Indigenous legal traditions with the help of relational law, a theory that places relationships at the center of legal thought and practice.    
         
     
Andrea Goertz – Calgary, Alberta – A champion of the triple bottom line approach to the economy, society, and the environment, Andrea Goertz is a leading figure in sustainable management and infrastructure investment in Canada.   Heather Bullock – Health policy, McMaster University – is identifying the best ways to embed mental health policy into daily practice across the different layers of Canada’s social system.    
         
     
Gerard Kennedy – Law, York University – is exploring how Canadian civil procedure can be reformed to increase access to justice and improve relations among Canadians.   Stephen Kakfwi – Yellowknife, Northwest Territories – A former premier of the Northwest Territories and president of the Dene Nation who is a survivor of residential schools, Stephen Kakfwi breathes meaning into reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada.   Cherry Smiley – Communications, Concordia University – Cherry’s research aims to help end sexualized violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada.
         
     
Judith Marcuse – Vancouver, British Columbia – By weaving acclaimed dance and choreographing techniques with community outreach activities on youth suicide, violence, and social justice, Judith Marcuse has become a pioneer in integrated approaches to social change.   Samuel Blouin – Sociology and religious studies, Université de Montréal and Université de Lausanne – Drawing on field research, Samuel is analyzing how two approaches to assisted dying (Quebec’s and Vaud, Switzerland’s) are testing boundaries in medicine, law, and life itself.    
         
   
Marie-Ève Desroches – Urban Studies, Institut national de la recherche scientifique – is investigating the factors that influence the adoption of inclusive municipal policies designed to reduce health inequity in Canada.   André Picard – Montréal, Quebec – Thirty years of observation and fearless commentary on public health policy have earned André Picard respect as a defender of consumers’ interests, rights, and health.   Gillian McKay – Public Health, The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine – is researching ways to provide safe maternal health services during infectious disease epidemics in post-conflict countries such as Sierra Leone.
         
     
Neil Yeates – Ottawa, Ontario – After a 32-year career in federal and provincial public service in Ottawa and Regina, Neil Yeates applied his expertise in public policy and management to several areas, including the development of human capital.   Christopher Campbell-Duruflé – International Law, University of Toronto – analyzes how new rules of international law resulting from United Nations climate change negotiations might allow Canada and other international actors to respond to climate change in innovative ways.    
         
   
Aytak Akbari-Dibavar – International Relations, York University – is investigating the intergenerational transmission of political trauma in authoritarian states, where public life is tightly controlled.   Lynn Zimmer – Peterborough, Ontario – From journalism to community engagement, Lynn Zimmer works to prevent violence against women and promote equity in Peterborough, Ontario.   Anna Dion – Family Medicine, McGill University – is seeking to improve the quality and access to maternity care for marginalized women in Canada, especially immigrant and refugee women, and at-risk adolescents.

Follow us on Twitter @F_Trudeau_F, #PETFmentors, #PETFscholars, on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Source:

Sarah Saublet, Program Director, Mentorship & Fellowship, The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation, 514-938-0001 ext. 228, ssaublet@trudeaufoundation.ca 

Sarah Saublet

Program Director, Fellowships and Mentorships

2017 Team

Aytak Akbari-Dibavar

Aytak (international relations, York University) is investigating the intergenerational transmission of political trauma in authoritarian states, where public life is tightly controlled.

2016 Scholars

Samuel Blouin

Samuel Blouin (sociology and religious studies, Université de Montréal and Université de Lausanne): Drawing on field research, Samuel is analyzing how two approaches to assisted dying – Quebec’s and Vaud, Switzerland’s – are testing boundaries in medicine, law, and life itself.

2016 Scholars

Nathalie Bondil

As the director and chief curator of the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, Nathalie Bondil steers curative practices towards innovation and multidisciplinarity, generating dialogue in and about art in the city.

2018 Mentors

Sébastien Brodeur-Girard

Sébastien Brodeur-Girard (law, Université de Montréal) is researching ways to reconcile Western law and Indigenous legal traditions with the help of relational law, a theory that places relationships at the center of legal thought and practice.

2016 Scholars

Heather Bullock

Heather Bullock (health policy, McMaster University) is identifying the best ways to embed mental health policy into daily practice across the different layers of Canada’s social system.

2016 Scholars

Christopher Campbell-Duruflé

Christopher Campbell-Duruflé (international law, University of Toronto) analyzes how new rules of international law resulting from United Nations climate change negotiations might allow Canada and other international actors to respond to climate change in innovative ways.

2016 Scholars

Mary Anne Chambers

Rich in experience in private enterprise and the public service, Mary Anne Chambers’s work in community-building and on behalf of youth has benefited hundreds of students in Ontario.

2018 Mentors

Denise Chong

Straddling the worlds of writing and public policy, Denise Chong was a trailblazer for diversity and inclusiveness in the public service before raising Canada’s social consciousness with acclaimed works of nonfiction.

2018 Mentors

Marie-Ève Desroches

Marie-Ève Desroches (urban studies, Institut national de la recherche scientifique) is investigating the factors that influence the adoption of inclusive municipal policies designed to reduce health inequity in Canada.

2016 Scholars

Anna Dion

Anna Dion (family medicine, McGill University) is seeking to improve the quality and access to maternity care for marginalized women in Canada, especially immigrant and refugee women, and at-risk adolescents.

2016 Scholars

Graham Fraser

The commissioner of official languages for Canada from 2006 to 2016 and a former renowned journalist, Graham Fraser contributes a granular and historic analysis of Canadian public policy at the municipal, provincial, and federal levels.

2018 Mentors

Andrea Goertz

A champion of the triple bottom line approach to the economy, society, and the environment, Andrea Goertz is a leading figure in sustainable management and infrastructure investment in Canada.

2018 Mentors

Stephen Kakfwi

A former premier of the Northwest Territories and president of the Dene Nation who is a survivor of residential schools, Stephen Kakfwi breathes meaning into reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada.

2018 Mentors

Ido Katri

Ido Katri (law, University of Toronto) is proposing an approach to promoting gender self-determination that accounts for the diversity of transgendered people’s unique challenges and values their lived experiences of the law.

2016 Scholars

Gerard Kennedy

Gerard Kennedy (law, York University) is exploring how Canadian civil procedure can be reformed to increase access to justice and improve relations among Canadians.

2016 Scholars

Judith Marcuse

By weaving acclaimed dance and choreographing techniques with community outreach activities on youth suicide, violence, and social justice, Judith Marcuse has become a pioneer in integrated approaches to social change.

2018 Mentors

Gillian McKay

Gillian McKay (public health, The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) is researching ways to provide safe maternal health services during infectious disease epidemics in post-conflict countries such as Sierra Leone.

2016 Scholars

Cynthia Morinville

Cynthia Morinville (geography, University of Toronto) is exploring the lived experiences of informal workers in the global South who extract rare metals from discarded electronic waste. Her research uses documentary filmmaking and photography to tell the e-waste story in a new way.

2016 Scholars

Antoine Pellerin

Antoine Pellerin (law, Université Laval) is interested in the government’s power to contract and is examining the conditions required for this power to be exercised in the public interest.

2016 Scholars

André Picard

Thirty years of observation and fearless commentary on public health policy have earned André Picard respect as a defender of consumers’ interests, rights, and health.

2018 Mentors

Cherry Smiley

Cherry Smiley (communications, Concordia University). Cherry’s research aims to help end sexualized violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada.

2016 Scholars

Jesse Thistle

Jesse Thistle (history, York University) is studying the lives of Metis people living on road allowances – makeshift communities built on Crown land along roads and railways on the Canadian Prairies in the 20th century.

2016 Scholars

Pauline Voon

Pauline Voon (population and public health, University of British Columbia) is exploring how the link between pain management and addiction may affect risky drug use behaviours, health outcomes, and clinical practices and policies.

2016 Scholars

Neil Yeates

After a 32-year career in federal and provincial public service in Ottawa and Regina, Neil Yeates applied his expertise in public policy and management to several areas, including the development of human capital.

2018 Mentors

Lynn Zimmer

From journalism to community engagement, Lynn Zimmer works to prevent violence against women and promote equity in Peterborough, Ontario.

2018 Mentors