Daniel Del Gobbo

Scholars
2017
Study program:
Law
Current affiliation:
University of Toronto
Localisation:

Daniel Del Gobbo (law, University of Toronto) is researching the role of alternative dispute resolution in addressing campus sexual violence in Canada.

Doctoral research

Negotiating Fairness and Equality: An Alternative Approach to Campus Sexual Violence in Canada

Rates of sexual violence at Canadian colleges and universities are disturbingly high, yet rates of reporting sexual violence on campus remain worryingly low. As the media continues to shine a bright light on these issues, Canadian lawyers and legislators have been drawn into a national conversation about the responsibilities of school administrators, the police, provincial governments, the courts, and community groups to address complaints of campus sexual violence.

Daniel’s research will answer a controversial question raised by this debate: Should alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes play a role in addressing the problem of campus sexual violence in Canada? If so, in what circumstances, and what should these ADR processes look like?

Drawing on insights from the fields of feminist and queer legal theory, civil procedure, human rights law, and dispute systems design, Daniel is theorizing a novel approach to campus sexual violence law and policy reform in Canada. His research will recommend how legal and academic institutions should respond to campus sexual violence cases with an approach that is more or less adjudicative or collaborative, formal or informal, and punitive or restorative, in furtherance of promoting the goals of procedural fairness and substantive equality in Canadian society.

Daniel Del Gobbo is a doctoral student, litigation lawyer, and law teacher with a passion for promoting fairness and equality in the Canadian legal system. His work is driven by the need to expose the ways that power and privilege are distributed unequally in our society, often along gender- and sexuality-based lines, through legal processes. Building on his prior experience as a campus sexual health educator, Daniel’s research considers the role that alternative dispute resolution should play in addressing the problem of campus sexual violence in Canada.

Currently, Daniel Del Gobbo is a Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) candidate at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, which he is attending with the support of the Canadian Bar Association’s Viscount Bennett Fellowship and an SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship. Daniel is also an Adjunct Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, where he teaches two courses on the impacts of gender, culture, power, and ethics in dispute settlement.

Previously, Daniel earned his Master of Laws (LL.M.) degree from Harvard Law School in 2015, where he was awarded the Harvard University Associates in Canada Scholarship and received prizes for standing first in two courses relating to law, gender, and sexuality. Daniel earned his Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree from Osgoode Hall Law School in 2011, where he received the J.S.D. Tory Research and Writing Award for his academic work and the Dean’s Gold Key Award for his community involvement.

Before entering academia, Daniel practiced law in both the private and public sectors. After graduating from Osgoode, Daniel worked as a litigator at two large multinational law firms based in Toronto, representing clients in complex constitutional and administrative law mandates including the Independent Civilian Review into Matters Relating to the G20 Summit. After graduating from Harvard, Daniel advised Canada’s largest social housing provider on human rights issues, including on a special project where he advocated for victims fleeing domestic violence and seeking access to affordable housing. Daniel’s professional experience informs his critical approach to campus sexual violence reform in Canada, as he believes the most thoughtful law reform efforts are based in real world experience and dedicated to increasing access to justice on the ground.

Daniel’s advocacy work is committed to the public interest. He has advised organizations including the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF), Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA), and International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) on projects related to dispute resolution, women’s rights, and LGBTQ equality in Canada.