Guy Vanderhaeghe

Fellows
2008
Localisation:

A cornerstone of the Canadian historic novel and a strong advocate for the status of the arts in Canada.

Guy Vanderhaeghe is the author of four novels, three collections of short stories, and two plays. His first collection of short stories, Man Descending, won the Governor's-General Award for fiction and the Faber Prize in Great Britain. His novel, Homesick, was a co-winner of the 1990 City of Toronto Book Award. In 1993, he received the Canadian Authors' Association Award for Drama for I Had a Job I Liked. Once., and in 1996 his novel, The Englishman's Boy, won the Governor's-General Award for fiction and was shortlisted for both the Giller Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Published in 2002, Vanderhaeghe's novel, The Last Crossing, won CBC's Canada Reads, three Saskatchewan Books Awards, and the Canadian Booksellers' Ex Libris Prize for Fiction Book of the Year. It was also a selection of the British Broadcasting Corporation's television program, "Page Turners". His latest work was a two-part dramatization of The Englishman's Boy, which appeared on CBC television in March of 2008.
Guy Vanderhaeghe has received both the Harbourfront Literary Prize and the Timothy Findley Prize, given as recognition for a body of work. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Member of the Saskatchewan Order of Merit, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 2009, he received the Distinguished Canadian Award presented by the Seniors' University Group and the Seniors Education Centre of the University of Regina.
He has taught Creative Writing at the University of Ottawa and St. Thomas More College, as well as at a number of other writing programs, among them: the Humber School for Writers, Booming Ground, the Sage Hill Writing Experience, and the Writing Program of the Banff Centre for the Arts.
Guy Vanderhaeghe received an Honours B.A. and M.A. in History from the University of Saskatchewan, and a B.Ed from the University of Regina. Currently, he is the St. Thomas More Scholar at STM College, University of Saskatchewan.