Rosalind Raddatz

Rosalind is a Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge.

Rosalind Raddatz studies players and tactics in peace negotiations on the African continent, with a focus on intersections between culture, religion, and politics. As a political scientist, her work is highly interdisciplinary, particularly in its incorporation of psychology, law and management studies. Raddatz’s other research interests include mass violence and genocide, questions of individual and collective agency, motivation and choice, transitional justice as practiced by indigenous African cultures, as well as refugees and displacement. She is also an award-winning photographer and freelance writer.

Doctoral research

Accounting for Peace: Political Settlements and Democracy in Post-Civil War Sierra Leone and Liberia

This comparative study assesses the impact of power and resource sharing among former belligerents, third party intervention (as peacekeepers, mediators, as well as parties to the conflict), and civil society in recent peace negotiations and the subsequent democratization of Liberia and Sierra Leone. By evaluating the effectiveness and legitimacy of these countries’ last peace agreements, the project will acknowledge the inherent dilemmas in the simultaneous pursuit of peacebuilding and democratization.

The concurrent quest for peace and democracy often results in trade-offs that can undermine both these goals. The dissertation addresses such issues by establishing a theoretical groundwork that supports the idea that the goals of peacebuilding and democratization are often at odds, while affirming that together, power and resource sharing, international intervention, mediation, and social movements encourage warring parties to lay down arms and stop fighting. 

Rosalind Raddatz is a 2010 Trudeau scholar and she obtained her PhD from the School of Political Studies, University of Ottawa.  Her dissertation documented the lures that induced belligerents in the civil wars of Sierra Leone and Liberia to participate in peace talks, assessed the negotiating tactics used by various participants, and determined the turning points in the talks that ultimately led to signed, enforced, and maintained peace settlements.  Rosalind’s other research interests include institutional accountability, power-sharing, mass violence/genocide, post-conflict gender issues and mental health, refugees and displacement, civil society impact on peace and conflict, and applied and biomedical ethics.  She completed a bachelor’s degree in political science and philosophy and a master’s degree in philosophy at Concordia University in Montréal. Prior to her doctoral research, Rosalind worked as a documentary filmmaker, a writer, a teacher and a photographer. She is an avid art collector and is active in several non-profit endeavours, among other things as chair of the Board of Directors of Heshima Kenya. Rosalind lives, works, and trains horses in Nairobi, Kenya.

  • November 25, 2012
    Passionate about their opinions and ideas, the Trudeau scholars are often writing texts published in different media. Several scholars have seen their comments published on the Web, while others have had their work featured as articles.