Will Kymlicka

He is recognized as one of the world’s most influential philosophers, especially on the link between justice and diversity.

Will Kymlicka is the Canada Research Chair in Political Philosophy at Queen's University. Recognized as one of the world's most influential political philosophers, his work on the link between justice and diversity has helped to shape the debate on the rights and status of ethnocultural groups in liberal democracies. At present, he is investigating the role of the international community in promoting ideas of multiculturalism and minority rights, and exploring how Canada is sometimes invoked as a model for the rest of the world.

Elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2003, he has also been a visiting professor at universities around the world, with a recurring role in the Nationalism Studies Program at the Central European University in Budapest. He was the President of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy from 2004 to 2006. He has won numerous awards and honours, such as the Killam Prize in 2004 or the Trudeau Fellowship in 2005.

Professor Kymlicka is the author of many books and articles, and has edited numerous publications. His works have been translated into 31 languages. His best known books include Contemporary Political Philosophy (1990; 2002); Finding our Way: Rethinking Ethnocultural Relations in Canada (1998); Politics in the Vernacular: Nationalism, Multiculturalism and Citizenship (2001), and Multicultural Citizenship (1995) which was awarded the C.B. Macpherson prize by the Canadian Political Science Association, the Ralph J. Bunche award by the American Political Science Association, and Italy's Guiseppe Acerbi Literary prize. His latest book, Multicultural Odysseys: Navigating the New International Politics of Diversity (2007) was awarded the North American Society for Social Philosophy (NASSP) Book Prize, and was a finalist for the 2007 Gelber Prize.
Will Kymlicka received his Bachelors in philosophy and politics from Queen's University in 1984, and his D.Phil. in philosophy from the University of Oxford in 1987.